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Ultimate Challenge: Three sharp draws

By Christopher Lutz

Looking at the final results of the Ultimate Challenge 2017, the reader might notice the high percentage of drawn games. For example, all three players that tied for first place, Zor, Soloman and Thomas_A_Anderson, scored 3 wins and drew 18 games. So one might conclude that this tournament has been a boring affair? No! In fact, the drawn games were mostly a result of a "balance of strength", with both opponents showing near-perfect play.

To demonstrate the interesting fighting chess that was prevalent at the Ultimate Challenge, I have selected three games. In ocirema vs Dinkelberger White installed a knight on h7, in close vicinity to Black's king. Black had to fight hard to fend off White's threats. Thomas_A_Anderson, in his game against KingSlayer, sacrificed a pawn, a knight and a bishop to keep Black's king in the middle. Eventually White had to give a perpetual, with the black king dancing in the center between e5 and d5. In PublicEnemyN1 vs Time_bandit, the players exchanged blows: White took the f7-pawn with check, but a few laters Black took the f2-pawn. Both kings were close to being mated and White's e-pawn was about to queen. Again, a perpetual check brought the game to a logical draw.

[Event "Long 90' + 30'', Unrated, Infinity Ches"] [Site "?"] [Date "2017.05.10"] [Round "13"] [White "ocirema"] [Black "Dinkelberger"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C11"] [WhiteElo "2450"] [BlackElo "2400"] [Annotator "GM Lutz"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [TimeControl "5400+30"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} e6 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 2. d4 {[%emt 0:00: 00] [%B]} d5 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} Nf6 { [%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 4. e5 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} Nfd7 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 5. f4 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} c5 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 6. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} Nc6 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 7. Be3 {[%emt 0:00: 00] [%B]} Be7 {[%eval 0,5] [%emt 0:00:00]} 8. Qd2 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} O-O { [%eval 0,3] [%emt 0:06:33]} 9. dxc5 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} Nxc5 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:02:08]} 10. O-O-O {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} a6 {[%eval 0,21] [%emt 0:06:54] } 11. Kb1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:03:06]} b5 {[%eval 0,16] [%emt 0:02:35]} 12. Bxc5 {[%eval 0,53] [%emt 0:01:55]} Bxc5 {[%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:03:00]} 13. Bd3 { [%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:00:00]} f6 {[%eval 0,18] [%emt 0:04:14]} 14. exf6 { [%eval 0,36] [%emt 0:03:11]} Rxf6 {[%eval 0,35] [%emt 0:01:14] White has parted with his dark-squared bishop in order to create threats against Black's kingside. In positions with castling to opposite sides, it is often the question: Who comes first? In the game it seems that White has a little head-start, but Black has enough ressources for defence and counter-attack.} 15. Ng5 {[%eval 0,53] [%emt 0:02:31] Creating a slight weakening.} h6 {[%eval 0,45] [%emt 0:03:47]} 16. h4 $5 {[%eval 0,48] [%emt 0:03:40] White plays in a rather aggressive way, offering his knight for taking.} Bb4 {[%eval 0,44] [%emt 0:00:08] Black wisely declines the Trojan horse. Instead, he goes for counterplay on the queenside.} (16... hxg5 {is just bad for Black, as some sample lines show:} 17. hxg5 Rf8 (17... Rf7 18. Bh7+ Kf8 19. Bg6 Ke7 20. f5 Rf8 (20... b4 21. f6+ gxf6 22. gxf6+ Kd6 (22... Rxf6 23. Rh7+) 23. Nxd5) 21. f6+ Kd7 22. Nxd5 $18) 18. Qe2 {Bringing the queen over to h5.} Kf7 {Black's king is trying to escape. Other moves aren't any better.} (18... Ne7 19. Qh5 Nf5 20. Bxf5 Rxf5 21. Qh8+ Kf7 22. Qxd8) (18... Rxf4 19. Nxd5 exd5 20. Qh5 Kf8 21. Qg6 Ne7 22. Rh8+ Ng8 23. Qc6 Bf5 24. Bxf5 Rxf5 25. Qxc5+ Kf7 26. Qc6 Kf8 27. Qe6 Rf7 28. g6 $18 {with a decisive material advantage.}) 19. Bg6+ $1 {A key move, forcing the king to either g6 or e7.} Ke7 (19... Kxg6 20. Qh5+ Kf5 21. g6+ Kxf4 22. Rhf1+ {and the black king will be mated}) 20. Nxd5+ Kd6 21. Nb4+ $18) 17. g4 {[%eval 0,49] [%emt 0:07:12] Preparing g4-g5, once the knight has moved.} Qa5 {[%eval 0,39] [%emt 0:00:00]} 18. Nh7 $5 {[%eval 0,49] [%emt 0:00:22] Moving the knight to h7 is a crucial decision: On the one hand White installs a piece close to Black's king, creating threats. On the other hand this knight needs defending by the d3-bishop and it is rather difficult to bring the knight back into the center.} ({White had a less dramatic and less risky way to clear the way for the g-pawn:} 18. Nf3 Bxc3 {This is Black's most sensible way of playing, similar to the game.} (18... d4 $2 19. Nxd4 Nxd4 20. Be4 { is good for White}) (18... Qc7 {is not good either:} 19. f5 d4 20. g5 dxc3 21. bxc3 Ne5 22. cxb4 Nxf3 23. Qe3) 19. bxc3 b4 (19... Qc7 $2 20. g5 Rxf4 21. gxh6 Rxf3 22. Rdg1 {gives White a crushing attack}) 20. c4 b3 {Black has to exchange queens} 21. cxb3 Qxd2 22. Nxd2 Rxf4 {and the position is roughly balanced}) 18... Rf7 {[%eval 0,35] [%emt 0:00:21]} 19. g5 {[%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:03:18] White is ready to rip Black's kingside apart, so Black must act quickly.} Bxc3 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:01:18]} 20. bxc3 {[%eval 0,18] [%emt 0:00: 00]} b4 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:39]} 21. c4 {[%eval 0,25] [%emt 0:02:22]} b3 { [%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:01] The most sober solution to the position. Black forces the exchange of queen, thus heavily reducing White's attacking material. } (21... dxc4 {doesn't work for Black} 22. Bxc4 Kxh7 (22... b3 23. Qxa5 Nxa5 24. g6 {is very good for White}) 23. g6+ Kxg6 24. Qg2+ Kh7 25. Qxc6 {with a large advantage for White. A sample line:} Bb7 26. Qxe6 Rf6 27. Qe7 Bxh1 28. Rd7 Rg6 29. Bd3 Rg8 30. Rd6 Bd5 31. Rxg6 Bxa2+ 32. Kc1 Qa3+ 33. Kd1 Qxd3+ 34. cxd3 Kxg6 35. Qxb4 {and it's not clear whether Black can save himself.}) 22. cxb3 {[%eval 0,23] [%emt 0:00:29]} Qxd2 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:01]} 23. Rxd2 { [%eval 0,20] [%emt 0:09:56]} dxc4 {[%eval 0,16] [%emt 0:00:00]} 24. Bg6 { [%eval 0,10] [%emt 0:03:08] White constequently sticks to his h7-knight.} ({ Less committal is} 24. Be4 Bb7 25. gxh6 Na5 26. Bxb7 Rxb7 27. Ng5 gxh6 28. Nxe6 cxb3 29. Rg1+ {and White is better, but the material is already very reduced.}) 24... Rxf4 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:01:21]} 25. Rhd1 {[%eval 0,10] [%emt 0:00:41] Threatening Rd8+ and mate!} Bb7 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:08]} 26. h5 {[%eval 0, 8] [%emt 0:02:52] White has stabilized the g6-bishop which in turn defends the h7-knight. So Black's king is still in danger.} cxb3 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:02: 34]} 27. axb3 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:02:22]} Rb8 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:00] By taking aim at b3, Black reminds White that the minor pieces on g6 and h7 are far way from White's own king.} 28. Rd7 {[%eval 0,6] [%emt 0:01:02]} Ba8 { [%eval 0,8] [%emt 0:00:56]} 29. Kc1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:22]} a5 {[%eval 0, 8] [%emt 0:02:02] Intending ...a5-a4 so that both of Black's rooks can harrass the white king.} 30. R1d6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:33]} a4 {[%eval 0,8] [%emt 0: 00:00]} 31. bxa4 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:45]} Rc4+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:14]} 32. Kd2 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:38]} Rxa4 {[%eval 0,7] [%emt 0:01:14]} 33. gxh6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:31] White's attack has almost reached its goal ...} Ra2+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:54] ... but Black's counter-attack is just in time.} (33... gxh6 $4 34. Nf6+ {and mate next move.}) 34. Kc1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:11] White gives in to the draw.} ({If White wants to avoid the perpetual check, he has to move his king forward. Even then, the result should be a draw.} 34. Ke3 Ra3+ 35. Rd3 (35. Bd3 Rxd3+ 36. Rxd3 (36. Kxd3 $2 Ne5+) 36... Kxh7 37. hxg7 Rg8 {with a draw}) 35... Rxd3+ 36. Bxd3 gxh6 37. Nf6+ (37. Rc7 Ne5) 37... Kf8 38. Bg6 Rb7 {and Black keeps the position.}) 34... Ra1+ { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:56]} 35. Kd2 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00]} Ra2+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:20]} 36. Kc1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:44]} Ra1+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:06]} 37. Kd2 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00]} Ra2+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 01:31]} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Long 90' + 30'', Unrated, Infinity Ches"] [Site "?"] [Date "2017.05.18"] [Round "19"] [White "Thomas_A_Anderson (ct)"] [Black "KingSlayer"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D43"] [WhiteElo "2642"] [BlackElo "2524"] [Annotator "GM Lutz"] [PlyCount "88"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [TimeControl "5400+30"] 1. c4 {[%emt 0:00:48]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. d4 {[%emt 0:02:50]} d5 {[%emt 0: 00:01]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:01:33]} c6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 4. Nf3 {[%emt 0:15:47]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 5. Bg5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} h6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 6. Bh4 {[%emt 0: 00:07]} dxc4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 7. e4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} g5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 8. Bg3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} b5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 9. h4 {[%emt 0:01:56]} g4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 10. Ne5 {[%emt 0:00:23]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 11. Nxd7 {[%emt 0:07:50]} Bxd7 { [%emt 0:00:00]} 12. Be5 {[%emt 0:00:32]} Rg8 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 13. Be2 {[%emt 0: 03:12]} Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 14. Qc2 {[%emt 0:25:15]} c5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 15. d5 {[%emt 0:00:13]} exd5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 16. exd5 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Qe7 { [%emt 0:00:00]} 17. Bg3 {[%emt 0:00:30]} Nh5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 18. O-O-O { [%emt 0:01:06]} Qf6 {[%emt 0:04:25]} 19. Bh2 {[%emt 0:11:27]} Qg6 {[%emt 0:03: 49] White is a pawn down, but his pieces are well developed and Black's king is stuck in the center. Both players are fighting hard to keep the initiative.} 20. Qd2 {[%emt 0:00:32] In view of Black's king, White keeps queens on the board.} b4 {[%emt 0:00:41]} 21. Rhe1 {[%emt 0:00:21] Rather than retreating, White sacrifices a piece.} (21. Nb1 {retains the piece, but loses the initiative after} Bd6 {with an edge for Black.}) (21. Qe3+ $5 Kd8 22. d6 $5 { is an alternative in similar spirit as the game continuation. The position is rather unclear, e.g.} bxc3 23. Qxc3 Bg7 24. Qa5+ Ke8 25. Bxc4 Kf8 26. Rhe1) 21... bxc3 {[%emt 0:02:15]} 22. Bxg4+ {[%emt 0:06:44]} Be7 {[%emt 0:02:17]} 23. Bxd7+ {[%emt 0:00:46]} Kxd7 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 24. Qxc3 {[%emt 0:00:56]} Bd6 { [%emt 0:01:32]} 25. Qa3 {[%emt 0:12:00] And White invests another piece ...} Bxh2 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 26. g3 {[%emt 0:00:10] Sutting off the bishop. White is two pieces down, but the h2-bishop and the h5-knight are not participating. Despite the material inequality the game is a draw.} Qb6 {[%emt 0:04:23] Protecting a7.} 27. Qf3 {[%emt 0:00:22] ... but now the f7-pawn is attacked.} Qf6 {[%emt 0:00:47]} 28. Qa3 {[%emt 0:00:18] White has to keep attacking.} ({ Trying to regain some material leaves the initiative to Black:} 28. Qxh5 $2 c3 29. d6 (29. b3 Rce8 $17) 29... cxb2+ 30. Kb1 Qg6+ $17) 28... c3 $5 {[%emt 0:02: 05] Black avoids the immediate draw and starts attacking himself.} (28... Qb6 $11 {would be a repetition of moves.}) 29. d6 {[%emt 0:02:40] White excludes Black's queen from the queenside.} cxb2+ {[%emt 0:02:30]} 30. Kb1 {[%emt 0:00: 08]} Rb8 {[%emt 0:02:29]} 31. Re3 $5 {[%emt 0:00:46] Now it's White's turn to avoid the immediate draw.} (31. Qxa7+ {is perpetual check:} Kc6 32. Qa4+ Rb5 ( 32... Kb6 $2 33. Rd3 Qf5 34. Re4 $18 {would be unwise}) 33. Qa6+ Rb6 34. Qa4+ $11) 31... Qf5+ {[%emt 0:02:55]} 32. Rdd3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Rb4 {[%emt 0:00:27]} 33. Re7+ {[%emt 0:00:26]} (33. Qxa7+ $11) 33... Kd8 {[%emt 0:02:48]} 34. Rxa7 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Rd4 {[%emt 0:00:40] Now the d3-rook is pinned and White finally has to go for the perpetual check.} 35. Qa5+ {[%emt 0:01:49]} Ke8 { [%emt 0:01:19]} 36. Ra8+ {[%emt 0:00:08]} Kd7 {[%emt 0:00:20]} 37. Qc7+ { [%emt 0:00:04]} Ke6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 38. Qe7+ {[%emt 0:00:07]} Kd5 {[%emt 0:00: 00]} 39. Qb7+ {[%emt 0:00:08]} Kxd6 {[%emt 0:04:12]} 40. Ra6+ {[%emt 0:00:47]} Ke5 {[%emt 0:00:00] From a human point of view the black king in the center looks highly endangered, but of course it's only a draw for White.} 41. Qe7+ { [%emt 0:00:10]} Kd5 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 42. Qb7+ {[%emt 0:00:07]} Ke5 {[%emt 0:11: 20]} 43. Qe7+ {[%emt 0:00:31]} Kd5 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 44. Qb7+ {[%emt 0:00:12]} Ke5 {[%emt 0:02:27]} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Long 90' + 30'', Unrated, Infinity Ches"] [Site "?"] [Date "2017.05.18"] [Round "19"] [White "PublicEnemyN1"] [Black "Time_bandit"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C55"] [WhiteElo "2557"] [BlackElo "2501"] [Annotator "GM Lutz"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [TimeControl "5400+30"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 3. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00: 00] [%B]} 4. d3 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 5. c3 {[%emt 0: 00:01] [%B]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 6. O-O {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} a5 {[%emt 0: 00:00] [%B]} 7. Bg5 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} Ba7 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 8. Bh4 { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:03:41]} h6 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 9. Nbd2 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:13:33]} g5 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 10. Bg3 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:04:15]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 11. Re1 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} Nh7 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 12. h3 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} h5 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 13. d4 {[%emt 0:00: 01] [%B]} h4 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} 14. Bh2 {[%emt 0:00:01] [%B]} g4 {[%emt 0: 00:01] [%B]} 15. hxg4 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} Bxg4 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 16. Bd5 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} exd4 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 17. Qb3 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 08:22]} dxc3 {[%emt 0:00:00] [%B]} 18. bxc3 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:07:08]} Ne5 { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:04:35]} 19. Bxe5 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00]} dxe5 { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:39]} 20. Nxe5 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:41]} Bc8 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:33] It might look as if White has a big advantage: He can take the f7-pawn with check, opening up Black's kingside even further and getting an extra pawn. However, on closer inspection it becomes clear that Black has counterplay due to his pressure against f2 and his queen can come quickly to f6 or g5 and start attacking White's lone king.} 21. Nxf7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 03:48] White takes up the gauntlet. The mututal fireworks start.} (21. Bxf7+ $2 {is indeed not such a strong move. After} Kg7 {White's minor pieces are hanging in the air.} 22. Ndf3 (22. Rad1 Qf6 23. Ndf3 Ng5 24. Bh5 h3 {and White is in serious trouble.}) 22... Ng5 23. Bh5 Qf6 $19 {and the threat of ...h4-h3 leaves White in a bad state.}) 21... Qe7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00] ( Nxf7 )} 22. e5 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:38] Bringing the e-pawn into play. White can't afford to just retreat the f7-knight, as then the initiative passes to Black.} (22. Nh6+ Kh8 23. Nf5 Qf6 24. Qc2 h3 $17 {with a heavy attack against White's king.}) 22... c6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:53]} 23. Bc4 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02: 07]} Rxf7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:52]} (23... b5 {forces White to sacrifice a piece, but the position remains balanced.} 24. e6 bxc4 25. Qxc4 Qf6 (25... Re8 26. Qg4+ Kf8 27. Qh5 Bxe6 28. Qh6+ Kg8 29. Qg6+ Kf8 30. Qh6+ $11) 26. e7 Bxf2+ 27. Kh1 Bxe1 28. Ng5+ Kg7 29. exf8=Q+ Qxf8 30. Nxh7 Qf2 31. Nf3 h3 32. Nxe1 Kxh7 33. Qxc6 Qf1+ 34. Kh2 hxg2 35. Qe4+ Kh8 36. Qd4+ {and again with a perpetual.}) 24. Bxf7+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:00]} Qxf7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 00:00] ( Bxf7+ )} 25. e6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:51] Of course, the e-pawn has to be used as an asset, even if that means allowing a capture on f2.} (25. Qxf7+ Kxf7 $17 {gives Black an advantage.}) 25... Qxf2+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 02:02]} 26. Kh1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:01]} h3 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:03:07] The e-pawn is about to queen so Black has to create counterplay.} 27. e7+ { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:34]} Kg7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:28]} 28. Rg1 {[%eval 0, 0] [%emt 0:00:27] Apart from threatening to queen the pawn, White also intends to open up the g-file.} (28. e8=Q $4 Qxg2#) (28. gxh3 $2 {also opens up the g-file, but gives Black a precious extra tempo.} Bxh3 29. Rg1+ Kh8 {and now Black comes first, e.g.} 30. Qxb7 Re8 31. Qxc6 Bd7 32. Qxd7 Qh4+ 33. Kg2 Rg8+ 34. Kf3 Qf2+ 35. Ke4 Qe3+ 36. Kd5 Nf6+ $19) 28... Qh4 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01: 39] Black is up to the task and finds the only move to stay in the game.} ( 28... Nf6 $2 29. e8=Q Nxe8 30. gxh3+ $18) (28... Kh8 $4 {is not possible if the bishop is still on c8} 29. e8=Q+ $18) 29. gxh3+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:39] White can't promote his pawn yet.} (29. e8=Q $4 hxg2+ 30. Kxg2 Qh3#) (29. e8=N+ $2 Kh8 30. g3 Qh6 $19) 29... Bxg1 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:05:32]} 30. Rxg1+ { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00]} Kf6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:26] Black must avoid that White queens his pawn with check.} (30... Kh6 $2 31. Rg6+ Kh5 (31... Kxg6 32. e8=Q+ Kh6 33. c4 $18) 32. e8=Q Qxh3+ 33. Kg1 $18) (30... Ng5 $2 31. Rxg5+ Qxg5 32. e8=Q $18) 31. Rg6+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:16]} (31. e8=N+ $5 { is another option, but also leads to a draw.} Ke7 32. Rg7+ Kd8 33. Qf7 Qxh3+ 34. Kg1 Qe3+ {with a perpetual or a drawn endgame after} 35. Qf2 Qxf2+ 36. Kxf2 Kxe8 37. Rxh7 Kd8) 31... Kxe7 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:06:32]} (31... Kxg6 $2 32. e8=Q+) 32. Rg7+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00]} Kd6 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:40] The black king has to chose his way very carefully.} (32... Kf6 $2 33. Qf7+ Ke5 34. Nf3+ $18) 33. Nc4+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:09:05]} Kc5 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0: 00:00] ( Nc4+ )} 34. Qa3+ {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:01:21]} Kb5 {[%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:00:00] ( Qa3+ )} (34... Kxc4 $2 35. Qa4+ {loses the queen.}) 35. Qb3+ { [%eval 0,0] [%emt 0:02:48] And a draw was agreed.} 1/2-1/2